Archive for April 2012

4 Tips: How to Find a Painting Contractor

April 24, 2012

Painting can increase the visual appeal and market value of your home. Although smaller painting projects are easy to do by yourself, hiring a professional makes sense for more complicated, large-scale projects. Painting contractors perform a variety of tasks, such as paint removal, sandblasting, application of a wide variety of paints and wallpapers, paint mixing and surface waterproofing. They can apply paint to either the interior or exterior of a home, or both. As noted by the Painting and Decorating Contractors of America, hiring a painting contractor will protect you from any health hazards that might come with the job, particularly in homes built prior to 1978, which may have been painted with lead-based paint. Painting contractors will also provide a high-quality, professional paint job, and discard any hazardous materials when the project is complete.

Step 1

Ask any professional contacts you might have, such as general contractors or real estate agents, for referrals to a painting contractor.

Step 2

Visit your local paint store and ask for referrals. Record the contact information of the painting contractor for future reference.

Step 3

Verify that all of your referred contractors are licensed. In the state of California, you can do this by visiting the California Contractors State License Board’s online “Find a License” page. Eliminate any unlicensed contractors from the list.

Step 4

Contact the previous customers and ask them about their experiences. Ask about the quality of the work, the professionalism of the work crew, payment methods and whether the work was done in a timely manner. If possible, set up a time to view the paint job in person.

Contact Matt at Concepts In Color, Exterior Paining in Los Angeles, For more info about painting your house.

Preparing and Priming Different Exterior Surfaces for Painting

April 18, 2012

Concepts In Color knows that exterior walls come in many different styles and materials. Preparing and priming each exterior surface properly will help achieve long-term protection for your home and drastically increase the life of any paint job. Here are a few ideas and tips. (For more about Exterior Painting for your home, visit Matt at Concepts In Color about Exterior Painting in West Los Angeles and surrounding areas)

Stucco Surfaces
On stucco areas you want to thoroughly scrape off any loose paint and repair all cracks and holes. To fill gaps around windows and door casings use a caulk to fill the cracks. If you are working with previously painted exterior stucco you want to use a good exterior primer or surface conditioner.
A reaction may occur if the new stucco is not allowed to properly cure. Make sure the curing time is past before applying primer. 30 days is a standard cure time for new stucco before it can be primed and painted.

Wood Siding and Trim
When it comes to priming wood surfaces, you want to scrape off all of the loose and cracking paint. After scraping off the loose paint, sand the exterior area to remove any additional loose paint and create a smoother surface.
If scraping and sanding do not work and more than 25% of the coating is cracked and peeling, you may want to consider stripping.
When you strip, you’ll use chemicals or heat to remove all of the existing coatings down to the substrate. The stripping process can be a very laborious process so you may want to weigh the pros and cons of costs vs. benefits.
An alternative to stripping is to use a penetrating sealer  to glue down the edges of the loose paint then prime that with a thick high building bonder/sealer to fill and bridge the cracks and rough surfaces.

Metal Surfaces
When you are painting iron or steel, the most important thing is good contact between the surface and the coating. Metals rust when air and moisture get under the protective coating.
Rust can be like a cancer. Once rust is in the metal, it is almost impossible to get rid of. Surface preparation is so important on iron or steel. You want to use a good rust inhibitive primer. Rusting metal must be sanded to remove loose rust, and then cleaned. Using a phosphoric acid rust conversion product can ensure that all remaining traces of oxidized iron have been eliminated. Sand to smooth out any roughness and clean then dry thoroughly. Then prime with a rust inhibitive primer.

Masonite Siding
Most Masonite siding is delivered with its face primed with some sort of paint. However, if the paint has peeled or the Masonite has swelled due to water then special preparation is needed.
Pay special attention to the edges of this siding as this is its most vulnerable spot. Remove loose paint on embossed Masonite siding by carefully scraping or using a wire brush. The overlapping edge can be hand sanded with a medium/course sanding sponge. Smooth siding can be carefully sanded with a palm sander or rotating paint sander. The face of embossed, wood grained, siding cannot be sanded. Using oil base primers seem to work the best. Apply two coats of primer to avoid any future problems. (Talk to Matt at Concepts In Color about priming and painting services.)

Cement Board
Cement boards, also known as Hardie boards, are a type of fiber cement siding. Cement board is highly durable, resistant to fire, mold and mildew, and it does not rot.
Cement board does not need to be primed unless it will be exposed routinely to harsh weather conditions. If you do choose to prime your cement board, use an exterior acrylic latex bonding primer. Also, do not paint a cement board unless it has been thoroughly cleaned first, or you will have problems with adhesion.

Before preparing and priming any substrate on older homes, before 1978, check for existence of lead. Homes with lead based primers and/or paints must follow the EPA RRP rules for containment and removal.

Contact Matt at Concepts In Color about Exterior Painting in Los Angeles.